Why Do I Have Tennis Elbow?

Why Do I Have Tennis Elbow?

You may recognize this situation: The doctor diagnoses your elbow pain as something called tennis elbow–but you’ve never played tennis at all! Don’t be confused by the name – tennis elbow is a common complaint, and a background in sports isn’t necessary to be afflicted.

 

The medical term for tennis elbow is lateral epicondylosis, referring to the tendons attached to the bone in your arm near your elbow. These are the tendons that extend the wrist and fingers. But after episodes of repeated gripping or lifting, these tendon anchor muscles can become inflamed or degenerated. When this happens, the attachment of these tendons becomes weakened, and places a strain on the muscles. This can lead to intense pain. It often starts at the bony point on the underside of the elbow and radiates down your forearm. The severe pain can wake you up at night, or stop you from lifting your morning cup of coffee. 

 

Treatment and Therapy

The treatment of tennis elbow targets improving the health of these strained tendons. Restoring strength to the connected muscles is also critically important. The first thing that doctors usually recommend to treat this condition is nonsurgical management. This can include anti-inflammatory medications or steroid injections into the painful area. But in the early stages, a referral to a hand therapist is also highly recommended!

 

An occupational therapist, or a therapist who specializes in working with the hand, wrist, and elbow, will identify what is needed to alleviate the pain in the short term and restore the tendon’s health in the long term. Hand therapists use manual techniques that will help you to move smoothly and comfortably through the stages of healing. In some cases, the therapist may need to customize a splint or brace for you. They will also develop a program of exercises and stretches that you can do at home when you are ready.

 

Whether you’re Roger Federer or an Average Joe, tennis elbow can be a painful, stressful ailment. But a good therapist is key to achieving your goals when it comes to recovering, and is the first step on the road to getting you back in the action!

 

Article written by Joanne E. Petrunik, OTR/L. Joanne specializes in Hand Therapy, Upper Extremity Rehabilitation, Sports Injuries and Pre- and Post- Operative Rehabilitation. You can request an appointment with Joanne at one of our locations.

Physical Therapy in Williamsburg

PARK SPORTS IS NOW IN WILLIAMSBURG!

Physical therapy in Williamsburg has a new dimension!

We are proud to announce the opening of our brand new location in North Williamsburg. Park Sports is bringing new physical therapy services to the Williamsburg and Greenpoint neighborhoods of Brooklyn: hand therapy, runner’s assessment, women’s health, and the treatment of adolescent and adult scoliosis.

Our new building on Driggs Avenue is an elegant, meticulously restored 19th-century factory.  A tastefully designed and artfully executed renovation of this old building preserved the Victorian charm, but added the modern amenities of the 21st century. Our ceiling-high arched windows and exposed brick are a bridge between classic comfort and modern elegance.

CONVENIENT LOCATION

Just one block from McCarren Park, Park Sports Physical Therapy’s Williamsburg office is now welcoming clients from neighboring Greenpoint. The proximity to the park makes this new location a convenient stop for runners pre- or post- work out.

Our new gait analysis and human performance programs are geared not just to our sports rehabilitation clients, but to any patient who wants to improve their function. We can help no matter what your goals are: whether it’s to compete in the NYC Marathon or just climb ten steps.

We augment our expertise with the latest technology; our anti-gravity treadmill (Alter-G), state of the art running assessment software, and video analysis. In a recent online review, Williamsburg joined Park Slope as one of the best neighborhoods for runners in Brooklyn. We’re excited to provide the best in therapy and rehabilitation to a whole new neighborhood.

UNPARALLELED PHYSICAL THERAPY EXPERTISE

Park Sports’s board certified clinical specialists in orthopedics, scoliosis, and women’s health are excited to see clients from North, South, and East Williamsburg, and Greenpoint. As a participating member of the Hospital for Special Surgery and Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Networks, our practice is proud to meet their rigorous clinical standards. And now, starting in October of this year, we are excited to start providing acupuncture treatment to our clients!

You can make appointments for Physical Therapy in Williamsburg directly from our website. We look forward to seeing you there!

Our spacious exercise studio!
The new Williamsburg office is bright and spacious, with state-of-the-art physical therapy equipment and old-world charm.

 

 

 

Postpartum Diastasis Recti – A Pelvic Floor PTs Perspective

As a pelvic floor physical therapist, almost every new mom I treat has concerns over diastasis rectus abdominis (DRA) or “diastasis recti.” This condition happens during and after pregnancy because of the stress placed on the rectus abdominus (the famous “six pack” muscle) as a fetus grows within the uterus. DRA typically develops in the second or third trimester, when the fetus is growing most rapidly. Certain factors, like older age and having multiple pregnancies, may make a woman more susceptible to developing DRA. Simply put, the connecting tissue between the two sides of the abdominal wall called the linea alba, stretches and separates. Some women heal on their own, but others may not.

While brushed off as commonplace (which it is!), DRA is not insignificant. Any woman experiencing changes within her body is justified in her concerns, whether they are physical or aesthetic. Concerns I often hear are, “Is this just something all women have to accept? Why did no one tell me this could happen?” And the most common one… “Will it ever go back to together?”

The good news is that women are smarter and more empowered than ever before, and many are now seeking help from a pelvic floor physical therapist. If you are affected by postpartum DRA, pelvic floor physical therapy can be a highly effective approach!

Why is it important to treat diastasis recti?

The abdominal muscles support your posture, help control movement, and protect the internal organs (i.e. bladder, uterus, and rectum). If you are affected by DRA, you may therefore be at an increased risk for injury. The symptoms associated with DRA combined with the the many stressors that come with having a new baby can negatively affect a woman’s quality of life.

What does diastasis recti or DRA feel like?

The separated abdominal muscles usually do not cause pain, but the sequela of DRA can lead to dysfunction within the body. Symptoms usually develop gradually over the course of a woman’s pregnancy, and may linger following labor and delivery. Symptoms associated with DRA include:

  • Weakness within the midsection.
  • A visible and palpable gap between the rectus abdominis muscle.
  • Pelvic-floor muscle dysfunction.
  • Urinary or bowel problems (incontinence, leakage, constipation, etc).
  • Poor posture.
  • Occasionally low back, pelvic, or hip pain.

What is a diastasis diagnosis?

A physical therapist will review your medical history and symptoms. This includes questions related to your pregnancy, labor, delivery, breastfeeding habits, and physical recovery. They will also assess orthopedic factors, including your posture, range of motion, and muscle strength. Lastly, they will do a gentle abdominal muscle examination to note the degree of separation.

What should I expect in terms of treatment?

If you do develop DRA, the earlier you see a physical therapist, the faster you will be on your road to improved function! Treatment strategies include:

  1. Education. Your PT will be your coach and your teacher. They will guide you through a safe and effective plan of care and teach you movements to avoid early on (i.e. not to perform traditional sit-ups or crunches).
  2. Bracing. Sometimes taping or bracing the abdominal region can provide external support for women with DRA. It can also work as a cue when relearning the correct position for your midsection.
  3. Postural Training.  One of the most important components when treating DRA is improving postural control. This will involve activating core muscles such as your transverse abdominus (a deep abdominal muscle) and your pelvic floor without overusing the rectus abdominus muscle. In addition to strengthening, stretching plays a big role in postural control. While we often think all the muscles become weak during pregnancy, others may actually become overactive and tight. Your physical therapist will help you restore this balance. Lastly, they will help you transfer your gains to real life and review proper form when performing daily activities, such as lifting and carrying your baby.

In sum, DRA is a very prevalent condition that can be addressed with guidance from a skilled PT. If you have any questions related to diastasis recti or would like to get started on a PT program, I am happy to help!

 

Written By: Lacey Salberg

Lacey Salberg PT, DPT
Contact:
Park Sports Physical Therapy
Dr. Lacey Salberg, PT, DPT
lacey@parksportspt.com

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Increasing Shoulder Range of Motion

Increasing shoulder range of motion after injury or surgery is key to recovery and shoulder performance. Genya Royfman, PT, DPT is a graduate of UC Santa Barbara and received her Doctorate of Physical Therapy from Hampton University. She’s been a part of the Park Sports team for about a year now and has a passion for treating shoulder injuries. Genya, who is a former high school football player and currently an avid rock climber, has herself had multiple shoulder surgeries and experiences with PT as a patient. When it comes to shoulder issues and recovery, Genya says clearly, “I can relate.”

GENYA ROYFMAN, PT, DPT

The Shoulder and injury.

The shoulder is a complex joint built to allow movement in many directions: forward, backward, around in a circle, and away from the body. Muscles and ligaments help keep the shoulder stable and secure in your shoulder socket. Injuries can occur whether you are an athlete, super active, or an occasionally active weekend adventurer or DIYer.

Quick overview of your shoulder.

Your shoulder joint is a ball-and-socket joint. The head of the humerus (upper arm bone) is the ball and the scapula (shoulder blade) forms the socket where the humerus sits.

The scapula and arm are connected to the body by multiple muscle and ligament attachments. The front of the scapula is also connected to the clavicle or collarbone through what is called the acromioclavicular joint.

As you move your arm around your body, your scapula must also move to maintain the ball and socket in normal alignment. Keeping this alignment steady and sturdy is a life long challenge.  Injury to the multiple muscles and ligaments that keep everything functioning is quite common. Recovery is not always so simple however.

Range of Motion.

Shoulder Range of Motion or ROM is the measurement of movement around a specific joint or body part. ROM can become limited due to joint overuse, arthritis, or sudden trauma to the joint.  Lack of ROM is a strong indicator of injury, not to mention, it can limit your daily functions and cause persistent pain and discomfort. Working with a physical therapist, you will increase your range of motion and strengthen your joint. This occurs through joint manipulation and specialized exercises.

Like all Park Sports therapists, Genya performs detailed research into her client’s history and current injury before any treatment begins. After Genya creates a plan for her patient’s shoulder injury treatment or post-op plan in conjunction with her patient’s surgeon, often she is initially focused on strengthening scapula involvement. “I make sure the scapula is properly engaged, people tend to forget about the shoulder blade.” There are a number of early stage treatment exercises she typically begins with.  These will help work the scapula and also test early treatment ROM.

Shoulder Blade Squeezes.

It is important to engage the upper trapezius muscles at the start of treatment. Genya’s shoulder blade squeezes address the mid to lower trap muscles. As a result, they loosen the upper trap muscles. This helps to relieve neck and shoulder discomfort. Your trap muscle consists of three parts and has many different functions—lifting your shoulders, holding up your neck and head and moving your shoulder blade. When this muscle is tight, it affects your entire body. Tight traps are significant enough to influence your training, recovery, and overall well being.

Scapular Wall Slide.

The Scapular Wall Slide is another early stage exercise designed to improve scapula stabilization. Genya positions her patient in front of a wall and squeezes their shoulder blades.  The patient then slides their forearm up the wall maintaining contact with the wall the entire time. Wall slides train the muscles surrounding the scapula for both dynamic and static stability – controlling the position of the scapula during arm movement.

Treatment length varies.

Treatment length varies from patient to patient depending many factors.  Very recently, Genya discharged a patient that had been with her for an extended period of time recovering from a massive shoulder injury. “It was an emotional experience for both of us, lots of laughing, crying, and hard work.  She now has full range of motion and a healthily functioning shoulder. She is pain free and active again.  I am so proud of our work together!”

Our New Williamsburg Facility.

If you have shoulder soreness, tightness or an injury call us directly for a free evaluation. We offer free consultations and direct access to all of our facilities including our brand new state of the art center at 490 Driggs Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

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The Schroth Method for Scoliosis

 
The Schroth Method for scoliosis utilizes a three dimensional approach to elongate the trunk and correct imbalances of the spine. The goal is to develop the inner muscles of the rib cage in order to change the shape of the upper trunk and to correct any spinal abnormalities.

Developed by Katharina Schroth

The Schroth Method was originally developed by Katharina Schroth in Germany. The method uses customized exercises to return the body’s posture to a more natural position. It is standard treatment for scoliosis in many European countries, and is gaining trust and popularity in the United States.

Scoliosis Symptoms

Symptoms of Scoliosis vary. Pain does not always accompany scoliosis. As a result, scoliosis can present in a variety ways such as abnormal trunk lean, uneven rib cage/shoulders or even back pain. If you suspect scoliosis contact your primary care provider. Prior to Schroth treatment, an x-ray is needed as scoliosis can present differently externally due to overlying musculature and does not give us the full picture. So, knowing the bony anatomy allows us to monitor your progress and tailor your treatment to your specific curvature.

Treatment at Park Sports PT

Getting treatment at Park Sports PT means you are working with certified therapists trained in the Schroth Method. They are partners in your health and wellness. Your therapist will create a personalized plan just for you and your specific condition. Our treatment approach can treat scoliosis patients of all ages. It can also can be utilized to treat in all stages of scoliosis, including after surgery.

Throughout treatment, we look closely at the three-dimensional curve in the spine. We teach patients very specific ways to correct that curve or scoliosis posture. Once patients have recognized their corrected posture, we teach them breathing and muscle activation techniques to hold that correction. Essentially, we help train the motor neurons to sense when they’re in a corrected posture versus when they’re in their scoliosis posture.

The Schroth Method takes a lot of repetition and commitment from the patient to learn these techniques. That’s why home exercises are also recommend at least five days a week for a half hour each time.

Trial results show improved patient outcomes

Several trials have found that physical therapy scoliosis-specific exercises lead to improved patient outcomes. This includes less pain and improved muscular strength, muscular endurance and self-image. In one study, spinal deformity improved in 69 percent of patients who completed Schroth exercises. This compared to only 6 percent in patients who did not complete their exercises. The Schroth Method at Park Sports PT works.

Your Park Sports PT team will create a personalized plan and will help prepare you to work on your strength and posture at home. The result is long term care and a stronger and healthier body.

Contact Us

If you or your child has any symptoms or have visited your primary care provider and are looking for treatment, contact us today to learn more. We are here to help.

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Do You Know Why You Have Back Pain? Here’s How You Can Find Out

Are you experiencing low back pain and not sure why? You’re not alone, in fact: 9 out of 10 patients don’t know the primary source of their back pain. The problem is that most people seek treatment after they’ve begun exhibiting symptoms of back pain. While this may seem logical on the surface, here at Park Sports Physical Therapy we encourage our patients to take a more preventative approach to their wellness. At Park Sports, we understand how bothersome it may be to have the stress of back pain added to your daily life. Whether you are just trying to get through the work day, cleaning up after your children, or just taking a walk to get the paper, we know how much worse back pain could make these simple everyday tasks and want to help prevent it. We care about our community and hope to help prevent injuries before they occur/worsen.

The key is to go to a physical therapist before you begin to see the signs and symptoms of back pain. I’m sure that right about now you’re asking, “Why would I do that?” One, because physical therapists are trained to recognize the physical dysfunctions that may one day lead to back pain. And two, because eight out of 10 Americans suffer from low back pain at some point in their lives, so the chances are good that you or someone in our community could become a statistic one day.

Seeing a physical therapist on an annual basis is one of the most effective ways to prevent back pain from occurring in the first place, the way one might see a primary care physician. Doesn’t that sound like the better alternative? Great, now that you’re on board, let’s talk about what you can expect during that annual physical therapy appointment. The first time you go, your physical therapist will collect a complete picture of your medical history. During subsequent visits, it’ll be important to update your physical therapist about any changes to your health during the previous 12 months, but it won’t be necessary to review your entire medical history again.

Next, your physical therapist will perform an examination using a variety of tests and measures including a movement screen. A movement screen is a screening tool that’s designed to identify imbalances in your mobility and stability that may contribute to limited function or other impairments. This gives your PT the ability to see how your back, hips, core, shoulders, knees and ankles perform during a series of carefully selected exercises.

The information gathered during an examination helps your physical therapist to identify changes from one year to the next, a critical step in assessing your risk for back pain and a host of other debilitating conditions. If a problem is identified early enough, then your physical therapist is better equipped to discuss preventive measures instead of designing a treatment plan. And that’s how you identify the root cause of back pain and derail issues before they even begin. Mystery solved.

Our qualified and caring physical therapists here at Park Sports Physical Therapy are here to help! If you feel that you, a loved one, or any residents in the community could benefit from physical therapy please do not hesitate to give us a call at any of our locations in Brooklyn. We have locations in Park Slope, South Slope and Clinton Hill.

Unsure if physical therapy is right for you? Give us a call today and our administrative staff will be happy to accommodate!

Runner’s Injury Prevention Workshop Recap

We want to give a big thank you to all of you who came out to the Runner’s Injury Prevention Workshop. Boris and Julie really enjoyed presenting and getting to know more about your running goals.

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Recap

Whether you run recreationally, competitively, or for fitness, the information we shared last night is 100% applicable to you. We covered a lot of material, so we wrote up a brief recap for you and those who couldn’t make it out to our event.

Biomechanics of the Foot

foot pronation and supination chart

Boris and Julie discussed what pronation and supination is and how it can affect your foot if there is a mechanical abnormality. They mentioned individuals’ variations in the foot and ankle structure and how it is connected to the rest of your leg higher up. Other variables play a part in how fast, how long, and efficiently you run. They touched on proper running mechanics and emphasized the form over the speed and distance.

When you run your body experiences impact many times your body weight on each stride. It’s important to understand how your feet land to make the appropriate adjustments. A physical therapist or personal trainer specializing in gait analysis can help in this regard.

The Importance of Core Strength

core muscles

One cannot overstate the importance of core strength in any physical activity and this includes running. Your core ensures your body’s stability, balance, proper posture, and control. Strengthening your core comes with many benefits including injury prevention. In regards to running, when your core muscles – your pelvis, abdominal, hips, and back – all work in sync, you are able to remain solid as your foot strikes the ground. If you are a long distance runner, you know how important maintaining proper posture is. A strong core will improve your running time, endurance, stamina, and help reduce the chances of injury.

Strengthening Your Glutes

Glutes Breakdown

Your glutes are made up of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and gluteus minimus. They all play an important role during your run. We want to make sure that each of these muscles is strong so that other parts of your body aren’t overcompensating for their lack of engagement.

Your gluteus medius and minimus are abductors and help move your legs away from your body. The gluteus maximus is used for hip extension.

Julie mentioned that too much sitting can lead to weak glutes since they are not activated in that position. On the opposite end, your hip flexors shorten since sitting keeps them in a contracted position. Both Boris and Julie recommend that you do the following exercises:

  • Glute Bridge
  • Lunges
  • Squats
  • Clamshells

Dynamic Stretching

Dynamic Stretching

Although recent research has shown that stretching before a run does not help to prevent injury, there are some benefits to stretchings.

Both Boris and Julie encourage dynamic stretching in which your body is moving while you stretch. This ensures that your muscles are warmed up and ready to go.

Common Tight Spots for Runners

We suggest that you keep a close eye on these parts of the body before, during, and after your run.

  • ITB
  • Achilles
  • Hip Flexors
  • Hamstrings

Plantar Fasciitis

plantar fascitiis

Some of you had concerns about plantar fasciitis. Your plantar fascia is a thin ligament that lies on the bottom of your foot. It connects from the heel all the way to the front of your foot. It helps to support the arch of your foot and plays an important role in walking and running mechanics. If you suffer from heel pain after a run, chances are high that you suffer from plantar fasciitis which is the inflammation of this ligament. Symptoms are described as a shooting pain near the heel. The pain is usually worse in the morning or after long periods of rest.

When you run there is a lot of pressure and force pushed on the plantar fascia. This can cause inflammation and tightness.

There are many factors that can contribute to plantar fasciitis. Tight calf muscles or having a high arch can both play a role in plantar fasciitis. Seeing a physical therapist can help identify these issues and provide a treatment plan to manage pain or prevent pain altogether.

Are you currently experiencing pain from running? Participating in races anytime soon? Our highly trained physical therapists can help.

Running can put a lot of strain and stress on your body. Seeing a physical therapist can help you address any biomechanical issues such as muscle imbalances, gait, or tightness to prevent injury, improve your performance, and keep you running for life.

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Want to learn more about the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill and give it a try at our Clinton Hill location on Fulton Street? Schedule your first run here.

Brooklyn Half Marathon Crash Course Recap

We had a blast last night hosting the Crown Heights Running Club at our Clinton Hill location for our Brooklyn Half Marathon Crash Course.

The presenters included physical therapist and owner of Park Sports Physical Therapy, Boris Gilzon, PT, DPT, OCS, CHT, Certified Coach for the Road Runner Clubs of America, Nate Turner, and nutritionist, Tara Mardigan, MS, MPH, RD, AKA “The Plate Coach.”

They shared a lot of great information with us. This post will serve as a brief recap of some of the material that was reviewed.

Dynamic Stretching VS Static Stretching

Dynamic stretching is preferred over static stretching. You will want to focus on “warming up” your muscles before a run or undertaking any form of exercise. This can be in the form of jumping jacks, lunges, or any other full body movement. Core exercises are strongly encouraged.

There is no correlation between stretching and preventing injury, but stretching is still very beneficial in other ways. Boris recommends holding a stretch for twenty seconds or more for the muscles to get the full benefit of the stretch.

Tara recommends staying properly hydrated as that also plays a role in the performance and flexibility of your muscles.

Anywhere from 7-10 minutes of dynamic stretching will be enough to get you warmed up.

Cross Training

Cross training is useful, but depending on your goals, whether they be increasing mileage, speed, or endurance, nothing can replace running.

Boris and Nate both recommend strategic planning in terms of setting up a schedule for training to achieve your goals. The example given was a six-month training schedule. Boris recommends starting off with a light workout and running schedule at the very beginning and then increasing the intensity of theworkoutss as time progresses. This allows the body to adapt.

According to Nate, you should plan ahead and find ways to stimulate the climate of the actual race. For instance, if you are training during the colder seasons for a race that takes place during warmer seasons, you should try running in warmer temperatures some days. This could be done on a treadmill indoors with higher heat. Don’t forget to stay hydrated during these experiments!

Identifying Pre-Existing Structural Issues to Avoid Injury

Having a pre-existing injury or structural issue can lead to more serious injuries down the line. Both Nate and Boris strongly advise against working through the pain during training. Structural issues can be evaluated by a medical professional, physical therapist, or even an athletic trainer trained in identifying imbalances in the body.

A physical therapist will be able to assess your body’s strengths and weaknesses and will be able to offer valuable insight as to how you can improve your odds to avoiding injury, whether they be through strengthening exercises, modifying certain movements, correcting postural issues, or stretching and manual therapy.

If you are interested in getting a movement evaluation done by one of our physical therapists, schedule your appointment here.

Increasing Mileage Safely

Boris and Nate mentioned when training for a half marathon or even a full marathon, it’s best to work your way up to running that distance.

Instead of flat-out running thirteen miles, you could distribute a certain amount of miles each day that adds up to the full thirteen miles.

For example, on Monday you run four miles, Wednesday you run four miles, and Friday you run five miles. You can slowly increase your mileage safely in this manner instead of just deciding to run ten miles one day.

Nutrition for Runners

Tara put together an excellent handout reviewing some excellent advice in terms of nutrition, rest periods, and more. Here’s a PDF of the handout for those of you who couldn’t make it last night.

Wrapping Up

To those of you running the Brooklyn Half Marathon, we wish you the best of luck. You have trained hard and whether you aim to break a new personal record, finish the race, or have a set time that you would like to finish, we are here to help.

Want to learn more about Park Sports Physical Therapy and get started? Fill out this form here.

AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill

We are offering a 20% discount to Crown Heights Running Club’s members interested in trying out the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill.

Schedule your first run today! Call 718.230.1180

Learn more about the AlterG treadmill and our rates here.

Injury Prevention for Youth Soccer Athletes Workshop Recap

On March, 28th 2018, physical therapists, Igor Kozlov, DPT, and Aaron Lentz, SPT, gave their first presentation at the new Park Slope United Club House, which just opened up their doors on March, 24th 2018 in Bedford Stuyvesant.

A lot of great material was covered including common injuries that soccer players face during training and games, the FIFA 11+ warm-up, proper footwear for different kinds of turf, and the benefits of the Movement Assessment.

Here’s a brief recap.

What is the Movement Assessment?

A Movement Assessment is an evaluation of your child’s body’s movement. Our therapists will assess your child’s body’s posture and core strength, search for any muscle imbalances, test their flexibility, analyze their gait, and test for balance.

This creates a baseline for them to improve upon. A Movement Assessment is useful for catching any inefficiencies in the body early on that can lead to injury. This assessment has proven to be an invaluable tool for many of the athletes we see at our practice.

Imagine your child being able to run with greater efficiency and producing less strain on their muscles and joints, or having the knowledge to jump, land, and pivot with a lower chance of injury.

Our therapists can help your child gain greater insight and control over their body, which will lead to greater athletic performance.

 

The FIFA 11+ Warm-up

The FIFA 11+

Aaron and Igor mentioned the importance of stretching and warming up before training and playing in any matches. The FIFA 11+ warm-up routine was created as an injury prevention program. Coaches and parents should be mindful and remind their young athletes to do a proper warm-up.

Recent studies have shown that the most common injuries in youth soccer players are torn ACL’s, Hamstring strains/tears, and ankle injuries.

Research has shown that implementing the FIFA 11/11+ warm up statistically decreases the number of injuries during soccer. The warm-up can be implemented before a game, practice or just kicking the ball around with friends.

The FIFA 11 is a series of warm-up exercises that are broken up into three parts.

Part 1 includes all running exercises, there are a series of 6 activities to be performed in part 1.

Part 2 is all about exercises that utilize plyometrics, balance training, and strength training. Part 2 includes another 6 exercises which can be changed to a more challenging level as the athlete improves.

Part 3 is the last section where there is just one exercise that again focuses on running. In part 3 the level of difficulty can be changed based on the ease of completion of the athlete performing the warm-up.

Download the FIFA 11+ warm-up sheet here.

 

Osgood-Schlatter Knee Pain
Medical Illustration originally sourced from https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases–conditions/osgood-schlatter-disease-knee-pain/

Osgood-Schlatters (Knee Pain)

Osgood-Schlatters is an overuse injury that is more common among boys from the age of 9-15 and during growth spurts. The presentation and symptoms are a pronounced bump below the knee cap, that is painful with activity, but the pain decreases with rest. The details of the injury affect the patellar tendon at its insertion point on the tibia and may affect the growth plate. Osgood-Schlatters can be diagnosed with a radiograph. This injury is caused by a lot of running and jumping activities.

Read more about Osgood-Schlatters here.

Proper Footwear

The last topic that was discussed was proper footwear for playing soccer. The shoe should fit snug with just a little room for the toes to move. Proper soccer shoes should be worn while playing soccer, not running shoes or cross trainers or basketball shoes. This cannot be stressed enough!

For indoor play, there are specific indoor soccer shoes that should be worn. When playing on artificial turf there are specific turf cleats that aren’t as long and have more cleats on the bottom of the shoes.

When playing in wet or long grass that is softer the cleats should be a little longer to provide more grip while playing.

Schedule Your Child’s Movement Assessment with Our Expert Physical Therapists Today.

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Runner’s Injury Prevention Workshop w/ Pongo Power

RESCHEDULED to Monday, April 30th 2018 @ 7:00 PM

Park Sports Physical Therapy – Park Slope
142 Prospect Park West
Brooklyn, NY 11215

Register for the Runner’s Injury Prevention Workshop Here

The presentation will be given by Boris Gilzon, PT, DPT, OCS, CHT owner of Park Sports PT, an avid runner and triathlete alongside Julie Petrusak, NASM Certified Personal Trainer, and director of the Rev up to Run! Training Program at of Pongo Power.

Join Park Sports Physical Therapy and Pongo Power for a free injury prevention workshop geared towards runners.

Here are a few topics that will be covered during the workshop:

Part I

  • The Physical Demands of Running – What happens to your muscles and joints during a long run.
  • Common Running Injuries – How they occur & how to prevent them.
  • Self-Treatment – We’ll cover the basics of icing, stretching, rest periods, and what problems to look out for.
  • Knowing When to Seek Medical Attention – Benefits of Physical Therapy

Part II

  • Becoming an optimal runner. The efficiency of muscles, structural balance, and building up endurance.
  • Technique and proper form.
  • How to safely increase mileage during training.
  • How to become a faster runner the safe way.
  • Benefits of cross training

Part III

  • Q&A

Space is limited to 25 people. Reserve your spot today!

Register for the Runner’s Injury Prevention Workshop Here

Questions? Contact us by calling 718.230.1180 or emailing info@parksportspt.com

 

Pongo Power

Learn more about Pongo Power here.